Insect Hotline Issue 18

 

 

Stipling damage

Two spotted spider mite damage (stippling) on leaves.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

spider mites

Underside of stippled leaves.  Close inspection may reveal webbing, shed skins, eggs and mites.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

 

TSSM leaf

Close-up of mites and eggs on underside of leaf.  Photo provided by:  John A. Weidhass, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 6

DSC_0074

 

Spruce spider mite damage from a distance.  Photo by Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

Mite damae closeup1

 

Close-up of spruce spider mite damage.  Photo by Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware

 

 

spruce spider mite closup

 

Close-up of spruce spider mite and an egg.  Photo provided by:  USDA Forest Service-NE Archive, bugwood.org

 

Sprucespider

Close-up of spruce spider mite adult.  Photo by:  Tracy Wootten, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 22

This issue deals with spruce spider mites and their tendency to have high populations after summer temperatures cool.  Since numerous articles have described this pest and the pictures have been posted previously, no new pictures are being added.

What’s Hot HL Issue 14


Two spotted spider mites. Photo provided by: Tracy Wootten, Horticulture Extension Agent, Sussex County, University of Delaware

Dogwood suffering from drought conditions. Photo provided by: Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Specialist, University of Delaware

Turfgrass going dormant under drought conditions. Photo provided by: Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Specialist, University of Delaware.

Gray squirrel. Photo provided by: Joseph LaForest, University of Georgia, bugwood.org

Squirrel damage. Photo provided by: Todd Watson, Texas A&M; University, bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 13


Two spotted spider mites with eggs (up close). Photo provided by: Tracy Wootten, Horticulture Extension Agent, Sussex County, University of Delaware

Two spotted spider mites and eggs. Photo provided by: Tracy Wootten, Horticulture Extension Agent, Sussex County, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 3


Privet Rust mites. Photo found at: http://ipm.ncsu.edu/AG189/html/Privet_Rust_Mite.HTML

Southern red mite damage. Photo provided by: Frank A. Hale, University of Tennessee, Bugwood.org

Spruce spider mite damage. Photo provided by: Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 23


Southern red mite eggs, adult, and immature. Photo provided by: Jim Baker, North Carolina State University, Bugwood.org

Southern red mite eggs. Photo provided by: Jim Baker, North Carolina State University, Bugwood.org

Spruce spider mite feeding damage. Damage occurs on older foliage first. Photo provided by: USDA Forest Service – Region 4 Archive, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Spruce spider mite adult and egg. Photo provided by: USDA Forest Service – Northeastern Area Archive, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 16


Distant view of bald cypress rust mite damge.

Bald cypress rust mite damage on branch (close-up).

Bald cypress rust mites.
All photos provided by Dr. Casey Sclar, Plant Health Care Division Leader, Longwood Gardens.

Insect Hotline Issue 2


Old spruce spider mite damage. Photo by: Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Specialist, University of Delaware.

Close-up of spruce spider mite feeding damage. Photo by: Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Specialist, University of Delaware.

Spruce spider mite egg and adult. Photo provided by: Photo by USDA Forest Service – Northeastern Area Archive, USDA Forest Service.