Insect Hotline Issue 23

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Leopard moth adult. Photo provided by: Esmat M. Hegazi, University of Alexandria, Bugwood.org

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Leopard moth larva (caterpillar) and gallery. Photo provided by: Jean-Paul Grandjean, Office National des Forêts, Bugwood.org

Orange stripe oakworm

Orange striped oakworm.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

yellow bear cran

Yellow woollybear caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org

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Yellownecked caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Gerald J. Lenhard, Louisiana State University, bugwood.org

 

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Tussock moth caterpillar.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

saltmarsh caterpillar

Saltmarsh caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 19

webworm damage DSC_0007-1

Fall webworm tents on trees.  They occur in the fall and are at the terminal ends of branches.  Photos by Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

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Orange (red headed) race of fall webworms (left) or the blackheaded race of fall webworms (right) could be found in the webbing.  Photo provided by:  Lacy L. Hyche, Auburn University, Bugwood.org

a1 fww pred

One management option is to tear open the webbing so natural enemies such as the assassin bug pictured above can eat the caterpillars.  Photo provided by:  Lacy L. Hyche, Auburn University, Bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 15

lilac ash borer1a

Pupal skin sticking out of the trunk of a tree.  Insect has emerged from the pupal skin which is left in the tree.  Photo provided by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org

 

 

ash borer, Podosesia syringae  (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) - 1304043

Adult Lilac/ash borer, Podosesia syringae, pinned for viewing.  Photo provided by:  Carroll Younce, USDA-ARS, bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 12

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Bagworms in the “dunce cap” stage.  B. t. and Conserve provide good control at this stage.

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Bagworm infestation with bags already drooping down.

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Damage from bagworm feeding (Photo by: T. Simms).

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Bag with green foliage incorporated into it suggests a live caterpillar inside the bag.  Insect growth regulators (Dimilin or Confirm), Acelepryn, Conserve (depending on bag/caterpillar size and population density) pyrethroids, acephate or carbaryl provide good control against larger caterpillars.  Caterpillar feeding is usually finished by mid-August, consequently hand picking in September – May is a good method to reduce next season’s populations.  Photos provided by:  Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 4

ETC larva wCit

Above picture is of a later instar of the eastern tent caterpillar.  Photo was provided by author imbedded with picture via insect images.org

ETC from Tracy

Photo above is a picture of an early tent formed by eastern tent caterpillars.  A successful non-chemical control strategy is to tear the ‘tent’ or webbing open so natural enemies have access to the caterpillars.  Photo provided by Tracy Wootten, University of Delaware.

ETC egg mass

Photo above is an egg mass laid by eastern tent caterpillar female moths in late June or July.  A control tactic here is to either prune out the egg mass or scrape the mass off the twig.  Photo provided by Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 15

The pupal skin sticking out of the side ofthe tree is often one of the first signs lilac ash borer has infested a tree or shrub.  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

 

 

Mating pair of lilac/ash borers (Sessidae; a type of moth).  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

 

 

Larvae (pictured) borer through the wood as they feed.  Photo provided by:  David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

What’s Hot HL Issue 13?

Horsechestnut leaf blotch.  Photo from:  Bob Mulrooney, University of Delaware.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos for brown patch, roseslug sawflies (search roseslug sawfly), bagworms and fall webworms (Insect Hotline Issue 20, 2008 has best images) have already been posted.  Please use search function to locate images.