Ornamentals Hotline Issue 3

April 15, 2014 in Uncategorized

Tent caterpillar hatching in Sussex County on 4/09/14

Tent caterpillar hatching in Sussex County on 4/09/14

Tent caterpillar egg mass just hatching on 4/09/14

Tent caterpillar egg mass just hatching on 4/09/14

Eastern tent caterpillar tent

Eastern tent caterpillar tent

Close up of ETC larvae

Close up of ETC larvae

Snow mold on turf

Snow mold on turf

Ornamentals Hotline Issue 2 2014

April 7, 2014 in Uncategorized

Aphids on a bud

Aphids on a bud

Spiny witchhazel gall aphids on leaf surface

Spiny witchhazel gall aphids on leaf surface

Dieback and dead foliage on a shrub may be due to winter damage fromt he replacement of a sidewalk section from last year.  Control is the same: reduce stress and trim out affected branches.

Dieback and dead foliage on a shrub may be due to winter damage fromt he replacement of a sidewalk section from last year. Control is the same: reduce stress and trim out affected branches.

Ornamentals Hotline Issue 1 2014

April 2, 2014 in Uncategorized

Indian wax scale overwintering on twigs

Indian wax scale overwintering on twigs

Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) symptoms on petunia.

Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) symptoms on petunia.

Insect Hotline Issue 24

September 5, 2013 in Armored scale, Insects

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Acer with die-back caused by Japanese maple scale infestations.

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Close-up of an Acer branch with gloomy scale (dark circular raised) and Japanese maple scale (brownish is the underlying skin after waxy white has been wiped or worn away).  Japanese maple scale are also the white kind of oyster shaped insect on the branch.

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Close-up of an Acer trunk heavily infested with Japanese Maple scale.

Japanese maple scale

Close-up of Japanese maple scale on a Cornus trunk.  The brownish colored insects are the same scale, but where the white waxy covering has been worn or wiped away.  All pictures were provided by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 23

August 30, 2013 in Caterpillars, Insects

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Leopard moth adult. Photo provided by: Esmat M. Hegazi, University of Alexandria, Bugwood.org

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Leopard moth larva (caterpillar) and gallery. Photo provided by: Jean-Paul Grandjean, Office National des Forêts, Bugwood.org

Orange stripe oakworm

Orange striped oakworm.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

yellow bear cran

Yellow woollybear caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org

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Yellownecked caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Gerald J. Lenhard, Louisiana State University, bugwood.org

 

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Tussock moth caterpillar.  Photo by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

saltmarsh caterpillar

Saltmarsh caterpillar.  Photo provided by:  Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org

Insect Hotline Issue 22

August 28, 2013 in Armored scale, Insects

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White prunicola or white peach scale on twigs of host.  Males cover the twigs and give the plant a ‘snowy appearnce’.

live f and m dead malefemale and cover

Close examination of an infestation (picture on the left) would reveal males (elongate and yellow), rounded and yellow, and dead male (dead from pesticide application; elongate and tannish brown). Picture on left is a close-up of the scale cover lifted off of a female white peach or white prunicola scale.

wps covered female with eggs WPS Gen2 Flipped20xB

Picture on left above is of a female laying eggs with the cover still in place.  Picture on right is same female but the scale covering (the ‘test’) removed.  All photos were taken by Nancy Gregory, plant diagnostician and Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

acrypt damage acryptmeria scale closeup

Picture on left shows banding on fir caused by Cryptomeria scale (photo by Brian Kunkel) and the picture on the right is a close-up of the infestation the undersides of the leaves (photo provided by:  Lorraine Graney, Bartlett Tree Experts, bugwood.org).

What’s Hot Insect HL Issue 21

August 28, 2013 in Insects

Cicada killer visit energy stop

Cicada killer visits magnolia scale (possibly tuliptree scale) for the honeydew (free energy source)

 

 

 

 

 

Scoliid

Scoliid wasps visiting flower for nectar and are frequently found flying over areas of turf looking for Green June beetle larvae to parasitize.  Neither wasp is aggressive or likely to sting unless handled; thus treatments are seldom warranted.  All photos provided by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 21

August 28, 2013 in Insects

Dogwood sawfly damage

Damage from dogwood sawfly larvae feeding.  They consume entire leaf but leave main veins.

Dogwood sawflies

Early instars of dogwood sawfly have a white powdery/waxy covering which they lose as the age and get ready to look for pupation locations.  All photos provided by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist

Insect Hotline Issue 20

August 28, 2013 in Insects, Soft scales

close cluster magnolia scalehoneydew drop

Magnolia scale on star magnolia trees.  Notice the drop of honeydew about to fall from the swelling female on the right.  Dark patches on the trunk are sooty mold growing on the honeydew.

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Tuliptree scale on tulip popular.  This scale also produces copious amounts of honeydew and looks very similar to magnolia scale.  Microscopic investigation reveals which species.  Crawlers are active for both species about the same time and scouting is crucial to know when they are active.  Use GDD to target ideal scouting times.

Mealybug destroyer on scale

The white waxy insect in this picture is a lady beetle larva feeding on the adult scales.  All pictures were taken by:  Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

Insect Hotline Issue 19

August 27, 2013 in Caterpillars, Insects

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Fall webworm tents on trees.  They occur in the fall and are at the terminal ends of branches.  Photos by Brian Kunkel, Ornamentals IPM Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

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Orange (red headed) race of fall webworms (left) or the blackheaded race of fall webworms (right) could be found in the webbing.  Photo provided by:  Lacy L. Hyche, Auburn University, Bugwood.org

a1 fww pred

One management option is to tear open the webbing so natural enemies such as the assassin bug pictured above can eat the caterpillars.  Photo provided by:  Lacy L. Hyche, Auburn University, Bugwood.org