Category Archives: Feature

Delaware Cooperative Extension works to bring healthy food to urban areas

With the help of Delaware Cooperative Extension, urban farms and gardens are popping up all over the First State, providing a much-needed healthy food source and beautifying areas that otherwise wouldn’t have access to fresh vegetables or flowers.

Many of these gardens rely on the expertise of Cooperative Extension agents and the services extension provides, such as soil testing, plant pest identification and disease diagnostics.

One that has been particularly well served by extension is the Planting Hope Urban Farm located on North DuPont Highway in New Castle and is a partnership between the Delaware Department of Agriculture and Health and Social Services.

Gail Hermenau, the urban farm manager for Planting Hope, said the farm supports a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program that recently expanded to include families and children from the Terry Psychiatric Center, a campus market as well as a community garden space where they work with clients from the Delaware Psychiatric Center and the Division for the Visually Impaired.

The farm is in part funded by a three-year specialty crop block grant from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Hermenau said the children from the psychiatric center do different types of activities and plantings at the farm.

“They have two raised beds they use to plant a variety of vegetables, and they use that space to learn about plant life cycle and all the sustainable farming practices that happen on the farm. Then we harvest that material, and I usually cook something up for them and have a tasting,” said Hermenau.

Cooperative Extension is partnering with the farm to provide nutritional education in the class room for the students from December to April. Over the summer, they meet with Hermenau on the farm where she delivers a CSA share, one per household, to the Terry Psychiatric Center that’s distributed among resident children and children who are part of the day program.

Extending knowledge

Hermenau said she was always fascinated by gardening, but her interest and knowledge base took off when in 2004 she trained to become a volunteer educator in Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardener program, and later trained to become Master Composter and Master Food Educators.

Hermenau said getting involved with Cooperative Extension was the “best thing I ever did. Cooperative Extension is a wonderful organization. It’s made a tremendous difference in my life personally and professionally.”

Having been trained as a Master Gardener with a specialty in composting and vegetable gardening, Hermenau installed the original four raised beds, borders and compost site at the demonstration garden located in the back of the New Castle County Cooperative Extension building located on Wyoming Road.

Her role as a Master Gardener now includes working in the areas of community gardening and urban agriculture. It was in this role that she attended the Joint Council of Extension Professionals conference with Michelle Rodgers, associate dean of the University of Delaware’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and director of UD Cooperative Extension, Maria Pippidis, New Castle County director and extension educator for family and consumer sciences, Nancy Bell, a Master Gardener, and Karen Sommers, a Master Food Educator.

The last day of the conference included a trip to Capitol Hill. At that time, Hermenau and the other Delaware extension professionals were able to talk about the low cost and free services extension provides to the Delaware community and invite Delaware Sen. Tom Carper to visit the urban farms and gardens in Wilmington.

Senatorial tour

Carper toured urban gardens and farms in Wilmington on May 30, including the E.D. Robinson 12th and Brandywine Farm and the South Bridge Community Garden, which Hermenau said was started by Randi Novakoff and a variety of partners including extension which was instrumental in helping get off the ground.

“One of the first things that the Southbridge community did was contact extension, and that’s what a lot of people do. They contact extension staff, in this case Carrie Murphy, [extension agent and the lawn and garden program leader], and explain ‘this is what I need to do, how do I go about doing this and can you help me?’ Carrie then provides assistance and makes connections to the appropriate experts including master gardeners and master food educators,” said Hermenau.

Carper was also able to tour Planting Hope where he had the opportunity to speak with community garden members, learn about how the garden helps a variety of people including those in drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs and clients from the division of the visually impaired, and how the garden members use various extension services throughout the year in a variety of ways.

While each urban community garden and farm is unique, Hermenau said the goal is always the same: for community gardens to be led by members of the community.

“Extension is always there as a resource, but we found that community ownership of the garden is really necessary to make it successful,” said Hermenau. “They need to make it their own. They come to us for resources, but we don’t go to them and tell them ‘this is what you should be doing and this is how you should be doing it.’ We tell them, ‘We’re here and these are the resources we have, how can we help you?’ That’s our approach.”

Ultimately, these urban farms and community gardens serve many purposes for the communities in which they are installed, not the least of which is providing fresh vegetables to communities in need.

“Urban gardening and farming is really important. When you think about the different communities with limited access to fresh vegetables, many of the members of that community also have limited access to transportation so any of these resources they can take advantage of make a big difference,” said Hermenau. “The areas that they work in, they were abandoned lots and so it improves and beautifies their neighborhood. It makes a difference in changing the neighborhood, and it makes the community come alive.”

Article on UDaily

Photo by Evan Krape

Not a meat eater? Have questions about gluten?

Find out what’s new in nutrition programming

Do you or someone you know avoid eating meat or gluten?  Do you ever wonder why some people are considered vegan and others vegetarian?  How about what foods contain gluten, or if you should avoid it?  The University of Delaware Cooperative Extension has the answers to these questions and more!

Find out from our 3 new Speaker Bureau Topics.

VEGucate Yourself: The 5 W’s of Vegetarian & Vegan Diets

This one-hour program separates fact from fiction about vegetarian and vegan diets. Some alternative sources of nutrients that would normally be supplied by meat are discussed with participants.  The possibility of following these diets throughout the lifespan is discussed as well. All different vegetarian and vegan diets are compared with hands-on tips and tools to follow.

Gluten: the Basics

Gluten is a hot topic in today’s culture.  This interactive, fun program explains what gluten is and why some, not all, need to avoid gluten.  In one-hour, participants can walk away with an understanding of what foods contain gluten and why some need to avoid it.

Celiac Disease: Living Gluten Free

This one and a half hour program takes an in-depth look at celiac disease and gluten-free diets for healthcare professionals and those with celiac disease.  Participants can expect to walk away with a deeper understanding of exactly what living a gluten-free life entails.  Participants will learn what foods and other items contain gluten and how to avoid them.

For a complete list of programs please visit:

http://cdn.extension.udel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/23061644/Nutrition-and-Food-Safety-Speakers-Bureau-Topics-May2017.pdf

To schedule one of these programs for your group please visit:   http://extension.udel.edu/fcs/request-a-fcs-speaker/

Visit our Gardens!

Collage of garden pictures
Throughout the state, our teaching or demonstration gardens offer an array of diverse selections and an opportunities to experience what grows well in our area.

What grows well in our USDA Zone 7a and 7b? What native plants work best in Delaware? Plan a visit to learn about pollinator gardens, growing vegetables, introducing children to the joys of garden exploration, accessible gardening, trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Rest on one of our benches and be inspired by the creativity designed by our Extension staff and Master Gardener volunteer experts!

Our gardens are often the venue for informative community workshops and special events like March to the Garden (in New Castle County) and a Day in the Garden (in Sussex County.)

Celebrating National Pollinator Week

Cooperative Extension’s Lawn and Garden team celebrated National Pollinator Week Monday, June 19-23 by providing tips and suggesting plants to attract and support pollinators in your gardens and landscapes.  Plants recommended by our experts included asters, mountain mint, New York ironweed, purple coneflower, goldenrod, milkweed and more.

Check out the conversation and like us on Facebook for additional pollinator info and plant recommendations, Master Gardener minutes, upcoming program announcements, and more. https://www.facebook.com/UDCooperativeExtension/

Delaware 4-H Afterschool Mentoring Program

The 4-H Afterschool Mentoring Program is busy with STEM activities facilitated in a youth/ adult mentoring format working in groups in the afterschool programs. This is our 7th year of the program supported by a grant from the National 4-H Council- Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Mentoring Program.  Each week mentors and small groups of mentees meet to work together on hands- on science activities that focus on STEM skills in a variety of topic areas including Robotics, Recycling, Earth Science, Food Science, Media arts and more. Often the projects have service learning goals that helps the 4-H youth focus their skills by addressing a community need, brainstorming an innovative solution, producing the items, and providing them to community members.

At the Kirk Middle School 4-H Afterschool Program, mentors and mentees in the Recycle Club invented a portable blanket made out of recycled plastic grocery bags. The recycled mats were given to shelter programs for homeless people living in Wilmington.

The Delaware Military 4-H mentoring group held two Day of Service Camps for mentees. They worked on projects for local and national charities. Projects included fleece blankets for Project Linus, survival bracelets and neck gators for Operation Gratitude, freezer meals for local Code Purple locations, placemats and cards for local Meals on Wheels, capes for the Hero Project, quilt squares for Quilts of Valor and Art for Art for Hospice. Mentee families joined in to help with the service projects.

At our new site La Casita in Sussex the mentees are all 1st generation Americans with parents predominantly from Guatemala and Mexico who are enjoying many new experiences. We utilized field trips as family engagement opportunities inviting parents to attend trips to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and the Air and Space Museum in DC to share in the new experiences with their children.
The five mentoring program sites are looking forward to continuing activities in STEM and service learning projects over the summer at day camp programming.

Got Fresh Fruits & Veggies? Delaware Does!

boxes of vegetables

One thing I always look forward to is the first day of Spring, warm weather, and the many opportunities for fresh, local produce the upcoming seasons will bring.  If you know anything about Delaware, it is probably that there is a farm of some type on just about every back road – which is a great thing when it comes to healthy eating!

There are many benefits of buying local produce.  In most cases, it was harvested just hours before being sold which means it will contain the most nutrients as possible.  Buying from local farmers is also great for our local economy – which is important now more than ever.

Community Supported Agriculture

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is becoming a popular way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer.  Here is how it typically works:  A farmer offers a certain number of “shares” to the public which usually consist of a box of vegetables and sometimes may also include other farms products such as eggs and milk.  Weekly shares are purchased upfront through a membership or subscription and are available through pick-up or delivery each week throughout the farming season.  For more information on CSAs visit:  www.localharvest.org/csa/.

Farmer’s Markets

A Farmer’s Market is an area where local growers gather once or twice a week to sell their produce directly to the public.  The 2010 Directory of Delaware Farmer’s Markets can be found on the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s website by visiting http://dda.delaware.gov/marketing/FarmersMarketsGuide.shtml.

U-Picks / PYOs

A U-Pick or Pick-Your-Own Farm is one in which you travel to a farm and pick fresh produce directly from the field or orchard.  To find a u-pick farm in Delaware and other helpful information about canning and freezing fresh produce, visit http://www.pickyourown.org/DE.htm.

Roadside Stands

An informal, but convenient, way to purchase local produce is at a roadside stand.  Roadside stands pop up all over Delaware between May and July and offer many fresh produce selections including tomatoes, sweet corn, cucumbers, peppers and peaches.

Unfortunately, many children never learn where their food actually comes from.  In addition to great nutrition, farms and farmer’s markets can also provide excellent agricultural and nutrition education opportunities for children and families.

Locally harvested produce is the most nutritious and sometimes best-tasting form of fruits and vegetables you can get.  So the next time you get held up behind a tractor or combine, just relax and think of how lucky you are to have so many opportunities to eat healthy in Delaware!

The Importance of Water and Hydration

Why is water so important?  Often labeled “the Forgotten Nutrient”, water is what makes all the systems in our bodies work.  Composed of hydrogen and oxygen and naturally-occurring minerals, it is your best bet to rehydrate and energize. The Centers for Disease Control says water helps keep your body temperature normal, lubricate and cushion joints, protect your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues, and eliminate wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements.  That’s a nutritional powerhouse!

Fluid needs are different, depending on your age, activity level, health status, and environmental conditions.  Thirst should be your guide.  Signs of dehydration or excessive water loss start with fatigue and dry lips and tongue, but progress to heat cramps, dizziness, nausea, delirium and unconsciousness.  Anyone with a medical condition requiring fluid control, athletes, and those living in extreme conditions have individual water requirements which may not follow current general recommendations.

Summer’s hot temperatures, direct sunlight, and humid days can quickly dehydrate kids at play.  Smaller body size means kids dehydrate quicker than adults, plus, they may be less experienced recognizing the signs of dehydration.

Early signs of kids with dehydration are: fatigue, thirst, dry lips and tongue, lack of energy and being overheated.  It is so important to treat these signs early, before painful heat cramps of the arms, legs, abdomen or heat exhaustion occurs.  Heat exhaustion shows up as dizziness, nausea, vomiting, headaches, weakness, and muscle pain.  Untreated, these symptoms worsen and heat stroke occurs, including nausea and vomiting, seizures, delirium, shortness of breath, a temperature of 104 degrees or higher, and unconsciousness.

Pack water wherever you go in the summer.  Caffeine and added sugars found in soft drinks and nonnutritive beverages can actually dehydrate kids and even healthful juices contribute excess calories.  Choose water and offer it to kids often, especially when they are active or exercising and losing more body fluid through sweat.   From the American Academy of Pediatrics Sun and Water Safety tips, 5/2/2017 “before outdoor physical activities, children should drink freely and should not feel thirsty. During activities less than one hour, water alone is fine. Kids should always have water or a sports drink available and take a break to drink every 20 minutes while active in the heat. 5 ounces of cool tap water every 20 minutes for a child weighing 85 pounds and 8 to 9 ounces for a teen weighing 132 pounds.”  Freeze water bottles overnight if kids will be out for a full day.  For a shorter time out having fun in the sun, chill water bottles just 1 hour in the freezer.  Keep bottles in a cooler or insulated bag to help keep them cool and your kids, too!

Are you drinking enough water? For adults, the popular guideline to “drink 8 cups of water each day” is not supported by hard evidence, but it is easy to remember and is similar (1.9 liters) to the recommendation from the Institute of Medicine for total fluid intake from fluids and foods. The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly about 13 cups (3 liters) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is about 9 cups (2.2 liters) of total beverages a day.  Remember, thirst determines fluid needs. The smaller body size of a child and inability to tell when too thirsty or hot should be a red flag for parents on hot, humid days. Children, four to eight, require 1.3 liters (5.5 cups). Teenagers need to drink more-about 1.8 liters (seven cups) for girls and 2.6 liters (10.5 cups) for boys.

To prevent dehydration and make sure your body has the fluids it needs, make water your beverage of choice. Water has zero calories, is sugar-free, and choosing water instead of sugary drinks reduces your risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Drink a glass of water or other calorie-free or low-calorie beverage with each meal and between each meal.  Drink water before, during and after exercise and on warm days. Some tips for hydrating in hot weather include:

Start hydrating right away. It’s easier to maintain your fluid balance if you start out in a well-hydrated state.

Schedule regular beverage breaks and keep a water bottle handy so you can take frequent sips of water while you work or exercise. Choose electrolyte-replacing drinks for maximum water absorption only when there is a need for rapid replenishment of carbohydrates and/or electrolytes in combination with water during prolonged, vigorous physical activity.

Drink water after you’ve finished work or an exercise session.

Snack on fresh fruits like berries, watermelon, peaches, and nectarines that are high in water volume. Other foods containing water include lettuce, broccoli, milk, orange juice, carrots, yogurt, and apples.

Don’t drink large amounts of plain water all at once – this can lead to hyponatremia or water-toxicity.

While rare, water intoxication is caused when too much water is consumed in a short period of time, diluting other nutrients in the body and putting pressure on the brain. This condition is called hyponatremia. If not treated, it can lead to coma or death.  Endurance athletes, such as marathon runners who drink large amounts of water, are at higher risk of hyponatremia. How do you know if you’ve consumed enough water? One way to gauge your hydration level is to look at the color of your urine. If you’re well-hydrated, it should be pale. Also, you’ll be urinating more frequently.

Water is also easy on the wallet.  You can save money by drinking water from the tap at home or making it your beverage choice when eating out.  Many people think bottled water is purer.  Both bottled and tap water from a public water source must meet the same standards.  If you get water from a private well, the owner is responsible for testing it, which should be done each year. Contact a private commercial laboratory certified to test drinking water or the Delaware Public Health Laboratory at (302) 223-1520.  The Safe Drinking Water Hotline is (800) 426-4791 or www.epa.gov/safewater/labs

For additional nutrition and health information, access our website at http://extension.udel.edu/fcs/

Photo credit: https://i1.wp.com/gettinginshapeafter40.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/water-pic.jpg

Keep water close at hand and your drink of choice this summer!

Cheryl D. Bush, MS, RDN, LDN

Delaware 4-H Equine Art Contest Winners

Delaware 4-H members of all ages recently participated in a statewide Equine Art Contest sponsored by the Delaware 4-H Horse Advisory Committee, a group of volunteer 4-H Equine Project Leaders.   Entries from budding artists from across the state were submitted for the contest in the following categories:

  • Drawing- Pastels/Charcoal/Graphite/Colored Pencil (Abstract or Realistic)
  • Drawing- Pen/Ink/Markers/Crayon (Abstract or Realistic)
  • Painting
  • Photography- Color digital or 35 mm film
  • Photography- Black and White digital or 35 mm film

Entries were divided into age groups for judging.  Awards were given to the top six entries in each category and age group.  A Best in Show Champion and Best in Show Reserve Champion overall were also chosen from all of the entries.  The artwork has been on display at the Chick’s Saddlery retail store in Harrington, Delaware during the month of May.  Delaware 4-H gives a special thanks to Chick’s for hosting the art display and their support of young people involved in the Delaware 4-H Youth Development Program.

Painting- Cloverbud Participants Ages 5-7

  • Ray Anderson III, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  • Makayla Goff, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Painting- Ages 8-11

  1. Leah Wiley, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  2. Alyssa Carpenter, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Hallie Terry, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  4. Carley DeFord, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  5. Allison Elliott, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Jace Goff, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Painting- Ages 12-14

  1. Josefina Giles, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  2. Cheyenne Bowman, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Alexia Carroll, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  4. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Painting- Ages 15-19

  1. Jessica Knowles, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Cloverbud

  • Ray Anderson III, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  • Makayla Goff, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Ages 8-11

  1. Caroline Allen, The Lord’s Clay 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Alyssa Carpenter, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Hallie Terry, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  4. Daisy Timney, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  5. Allison Elliott, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Elodie Hight, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Ages 12-14

  1. Sydni Brown, Holler- N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Sydni Brown, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Carine Hight, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  5. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Sundene Lodge, Hollymount 4-H Club, Sussex County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Ages 15-19

  1. Autumn Wallace, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Claudia Little, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Natalie Buchmoyer, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Sarah Brown, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers- Cloverbud Participants Ages 5-7

  • Ray Anderson III, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers Ages 8-11

  1. Stephanie Strachar, Hearts-4-Horses 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Hallie Terry, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Caroline Allen, The Lord’s Clay 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Savannah Timney, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  5. Hallie Terry, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Carly DeFord, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers Ages 12-14

  1. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  2. Cheyenne Bowman, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Riley Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  4. Josefina Giles, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  5. Gerald Carroll, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Wesley DeFord, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers Ages 15-19

  1. Autumn Wallace, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Claudia Little, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Amanda Jewell, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 8-11

  1. Caroline Allen, The Lord’s Clay 4-H Club, Kent County

Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 12-14

  1. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County
  6. Paige Taylor, Bridgeville Mustangs 4-H Club, Sussex County

Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 15-19

  1. Autumn Wallace, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Natalie Buchmoyer, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County

Black and White Photography- Digital or 35 MM- Ages 8-11

  1. Stephanie Strachar, Hearts-4-Horses 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Caroline Allen, The Lord’s Clay 4-H Club, Kent County

Black and White Photography- Digital or 35 MM- Ages 12-14

  1. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County

Black and White Photography- Digital or 35 MM- Ages 15-19

  1. Autumn Wallace, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County

Best In Show Champion AwardAutumn Wallace – Age 17- Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County Drawing Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil

Best In Show Reserve Champion AwardAutumn Wallace- Age 17- Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County Drawing Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers

4-H is a community of young people across Delaware learning leadership, citizenship and lifeskills.  We grow true leaders!  For more information on becoming a 4-H member or volunteer in Delaware please contact your county extension office:

New Castle County: (302)831-8965
Kent County: (302)730-4000
Sussex County: (302)856-7303

Cooperative Extension Education in Agriculture and Home Economics, University of Delaware, Delaware State University and the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Distributed in furtherance of Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914.  It is the policy of the Delaware Cooperative Extension System that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the grounds of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin.

STG 06/1/2017

UD’s Cooperative Extension offers food safety training class for entrepreneurs

The University of Delaware’s Cooperative Extension will offer food safety training for entrepreneurs on Tuesday, June 20, and Thursday, June 22, with both sessions running from 6-9 p.m. at the Kent County Cooperative Extension Office, 69 Transportation Circle, Dover, Delaware.

The cost of the class is $50.

Those interested in attending must attend both sessions to meet the food safety training requirements set by the state of Delaware for those who want to take advantage of the opportunity to prepare non-hazardous foods in their own home for sale. Examples of these foods include baked goods, jams, jellies, preserves, honey and candy.

Sue Snider, professor in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences and a food safety and nutrition specialist in extension, said that this class is necessary for anyone looking to get a food permit to produce these food products and sell them to the public.

“The Delaware Division of Public Health has passed what they call cottage food regulations and as part of that, they require at least one person, during the preparation of the food, to have gone through some type of training that requires an examination,” said Snider.

The class will be taught by Snider and Kathleen Splane, extension agent and family and consumer sciences program leader.

Registration is required. To register, call Jan Unflat at 302-730-4000.