Category Archives: Feature

Irrigation Basics Workshop

James Adkins
James Adkins, University of Delaware

As part of the University of Delaware Beginning Farmer Workshop series a workshop on irrigation basics will be held on Monday, June 27 from 6-8:30 p.m. and the Carvel Research and Education Center, 16483 County Seat Highway,  Georgetown. The Carvel Center is one quarter mile west of Sussex Tech H.S. Participants will meet in the picnic grove.

James Adkins, agricultural engineer with the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension will lead the workshop.

Topics and activities will include:

  •   Types of Irrigation – Drip, Hand move Pipe, Travelling Gun, Pivot
  •   Tour the farm to see various types demonstrated
  •   Flow and pressure requirements for each.
  •   Setup Labor and economics discussion
  •   Well/Pumps – pros and cons of centrifugal vs submersibles for use with each type of Irrigation.
  •   Crop water demands vs application demands
  •   Water needs, timing, application method versus evaporation and disease.
  •   Drip system design
  •   Pressure regulators, filters
  •   Tape emitter sizes and spacing, flowrate, length of run
  •   Trunk line design and layout, valving
  •   Connection and hookup
  •   Management, run times, pulsing, automatic controls
  •   Fertigation
  •   Injectors – pumps, siphons etc.,
  •   Calibration
  •   Products and timing

To register email Tracy Wootten or leave a message (302) 236-0298

irrigated farmland

 

UD Ornamentals Short Course Series, June and July of 2016

DSU Pest Walk 2012 CroppedPest and Beneficial Insect Walk 2016
Wednesday, June 22, 2016, 4 – 6 PM Credits: 2 Pest., 1 CNP. UD Botanic Gardens, University of Delaware Campus, Townsend Hall, 531 S. College Ave, Newark, DE. Learn to identify insect and disease pests, as well as beneficial insects in the landscape. Instructors: Nancy Gregory, Brian Kunkel, and Carrie Murphy. Meet by the Fischer Greenhouse.

Disease and Insect Workshop_2015Disease and Insect Identification Workshop 2016
July 13, 2016, 4-6 PM Credits: 2 Pest., 1 CNP. Townsend Hall, 531 S. College Avenue, Newark, DE.
Learn about signs and symptoms the Cooperative Extension staff look for to identify pests and diseases! Tips and techniques will be shared for fresh and preserved plant samples, and use of hand lenses and microscopes will be taught. Bring your own samples to look at! Instructors: Nancy Gregory, Brian Kunkel, and Carrie Murphy

2016 Legislative Day

Over 100 youth gathered on Wednesday, May 4, to attend 4-H Legislative Day in Dover. The participants met with legislators, participated in workshops, and attended a 4-H Rally on Legislative Mall. Participants were split into groups and participated in various seminars throughout the day. Workshops included visiting the State Auditor’s office, meeting with a Kent County Court Judge, visiting Public Archives, touring the John Bell House and touring the Biggs museum. Staff and youth had an excellent day learning about legislation in Delaware and understanding the history of our state. State Teen Council president,
Paige Vincent, closed out the day by delivering a briefing on the floor of the House of Representatives.

Delaware 4-H Equine Art Contest Winners

Delaware 4-H members of all ages recently participated in a statewide Equine Art Contest sponsored by the Delaware 4-H Horse Advisory Committee, a group of volunteer 4-H Equine Project Leaders.   Entries from budding artists from across the state were submitted for the contest in the following categories:

  • Drawing- Pastels/Charcoal/Graphite/Colored Pencil (Abstract or Realistic)
  • Drawing- Pen/Ink/Markers/Crayon (Abstract or Realistic)
  • Painting
  • Photography- Color digital or 35 mm film
  • Photography- Black and White digital or 35 mm film

Entries were divided into age groups for judging.  Awards were given to the top six entries in each category and age group as determined by a group of volunteer judges.  A Best in Show Champion and Best in Show Reserve Champion overall were also chosen from all of the entries.  The artwork was on display at the Chick’s Saddlery retail store in Harrington, Delaware during the month of May.  Delaware 4-H gives a special thanks to Chick’s for hosting the art display and their support of young people involved in the Delaware 4-H Youth Development Program.

Painting- Cloverbud Participants Ages 5-7

  • Joseph Casey, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Painting- Ages 8-11

  1. Leah Wiley, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  2. Regan Wheatley, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  3. Elizabeth Evans, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Leah Wiley, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Ava Casey, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Ages 8-11

  1. Sydni Brown, Holler-N Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Elizabeth Evans, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Sydni Brown, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Sydni Brown, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Lauren Russell, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  6. Leah Wiley, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

Drawing- Pastels, Charcoal, Graphite, Colored Pencil Ages 12-14

  1. Parker Boots, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Ashley Tilghman, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Taylor Heverin, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County

 Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers- Cloverbud Participants Ages 5-7

  • Aubree Duke, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  • Amaya Fleming, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers Ages 8-11

  1. Haley Deiter, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Kassidy Hearn, Holler- N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County

Drawing- Pen, Ink, Crayon, Markers Ages 15-19

  1. Autumn Wallace, Happy Harvesters 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Sandra Todd, 4 Hoof Beats 4-H Club, Sussex County
  3. Sarah Brown, Heavenly Hooves 4-H Club, New Castle County
  4. Hailey Boots, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Christina Chelen, 4-Hoof Beats 4-H Club, Sussex County

 Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 8-11

  1. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Stephanie Strachar, Hearts 4 Horses 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  6. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County

 Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 12-14

  1. RJ Shepard, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. RJ Shepard, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Kassidy Kohland, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Kassidy Kohland, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Parker Boots, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  6. Ashley Tilghman, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County

 Color Photography- Digital or 35 MM – Ages 15-19

  1. Ashlyn North, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Ashlyn North, Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Hailey Boots, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Cassandra Cordie, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Nicole Cannavo. Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County

 Black and White Photography- Digital or 35 MM- Ages 8-11

  1. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  2. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  3. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  4. Stephanie Strachar, Hearts 4 Horses 4-H Club, Kent County
  5. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County
  6. Weston Williams, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, Kent County

Black and White Photography- Digital or 35 MM- Ages 12-14

  1. Parker Boots, The Mane Squad 4-H Club, Kent County

Best In Show Champion AwardRJ Shepard- Age 14- Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County

Color Photography

 Best In Show Reserve Champion AwardRJ Shepard- Age 14- Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club, Kent County

Color Photography

4-H is a community of young people across Delaware learning leadership, citizenship and lifeskills.  We grow true leaders!  For more information on becoming a 4-H member or volunteer in Delaware please contact your county extension office:

New Castle County: (302)831-8965
Kent County: (302)730-4000
Sussex County: (302)856-7303

Cooperative Extension Education in Agriculture and Home Economics, University of Delaware, Delaware State University and the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Distributed in furtherance of Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914.  It is the policy of the Delaware Cooperative Extension System that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the grounds of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin.

The Puzzle, or Diagnosis of Plant Health Problems

puzzle-305529_960_720Working together, Delaware Cooperative Extension professionals help with trouble-shooting plant health questions through a variety of newsletters, fact sheets, workshops, eXtension Ask an Expert, and one on one conversation. Some samples may not need to be sent to the UD Plant Diagnostic Clinic, but may be diagnosed by Master Gardeners, County Agents, or Extension Specialists in the County Extension offices.  A sample submission form may be downloaded from the Clinic website, and must accompany all samples, with as much information filled in as possible. Diagnostics are like a puzzle; we need all of the pieces. Deliver specimens to Delaware Cooperative Extension Offices in Georgetown (856-7303), Dover (730-4000), or Newark (831-2506).  Please try to send samples early in the week so they don’t sit in a mailbox over the weekend. Some helpful hints are listed below, more info can be found on the following fact sheet: http://extension.udel.edu/factsheets/selecting-plant-disease-specimens/

  • A good sample shows a range of symptoms or a margin between healthy and affected. A sample with only one or two leaves or a dead branch probably cannot be diagnosed.
  • Place samples in a closeable plastic bag or tall kitchen trash bag.  Samples in open plastic bags from grocery stores or paper are usually too dry by the time they get examined.
  • Wet, soft fruits or vegetables should be placed in dry paper towels and then double bagged in case they leak.
  • Turfgrass samples should show a margin between healthy and diseased, for a section of turf with a bit of soil underneath (a 3 x 4 section is good). Disposable plastic containers with lids work well.
  • Anything sprayed with a pesticide should not be collected and sent for at least 24 hours.
  • Insect identifications can be made from plants, household, or foundation habitats only.

Nancy Gregory, June 2016

Freezing Summer’s Bounty

blueberries Freezing is one of the easiest, most convenient and least time-consuming ways to preserve foods at home. The extreme cold stops growth of microorganisms and slows down changes that cause spoilage and affect quality in food.

A recent study by The National Center for Home Food Preservation, at the University of Georgia, recently conducted a survey of home freezing practices and found that 94.4 percent of respondents home freeze some type of food item. Plastic bags are the most frequently used packaging material for freezing food items. Other containers suitable for freezing fruits and vegetables, however, are plastic freezer containers, or glass canning/freezing jars.

Though you may be tempted to recycle other containers, paper cartons, like milk boxes and many other plastic containers that foods are packaged in for purchase, like yogurt, dips and sour cream, do not provide characteristics for preserving quality in the freezer. You can use freezer foil and coated paper, as these are good for odd shaped foods and for keeping air out of your packaging.

fruitPreparing the food is important. Fruits should be washed and sorted before freezing. Discard those that are not yet ripe or of poor quality because they will result in a poor quality product once you thaw. Allowing fruit to soak in water will cause loss of nutrients and flavor.

Stem, pit, peel or slice fruit as desired. Another important tip: prepare enough fruit for only a few packages at a time to prevent browning. Do not use galvanized equipment in direct contact with fruit, the acid in the fruit dissolves zinc, which can be harmful in large amounts.

Use vegetables at peak flavor and texture. Whenever possible, harvest in the morning and freeze within a few hours. Wash vegetables thoroughly in cold water and sort according to size for blanching and packing. Blanching, which is scalding vegetables in boiling water or steam for a short period of time, should be done to ensure highest frozen food quality and shelf life.

Blanching stops the action of enzymes that can cause loss of flavor, color and texture. Blanching time is crucial and varies with the vegetable and its size. Under-blanching stimulates the activity of enzymes and is worse than not blanching at all; over-blanching can cause loss of flavor, color, vitamins and minerals.”

You can find information about how long to blanch your vegetables at: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/freeze/blanching.html

Water blanching is the most widely recommended method for blanching vegetables. Use one gallon of water per pound of vegetables. Put the vegetables in a blanching basket and lower into vigorously boiling water. Place a lid on the pot and start counting blanching time as soon as the water returns to a boil.

As soon as blanching is complete, cool vegetables quickly to stop the cooking process by plunging the basket of vegetables immediately into a large quantity of cold water. Cooling vegetables should take as long as blanching. Drain vegetables completely after cooling.

Many people like to freeze fruit and there are several ways to pack fruit for freezing, such as a syrup pack, sugar pack, dry pack or unsweetened pack. Most fruits have better texture and flavor if packed in sugar or syrup, however, sugar is not needed to preserve the fruit.

Sugar syrups can be made by dissolving sugar in water completely and then pouring it completely around and over fruit in the packed container. You may need to heat the water to get all of the sugar dissolved, but completely cool or even refrigerate the syrup to get it cold before using on fruit. Use 2¾ cups sugar to 4 cups of water for most fruits. For mild flavor or very sweet fruits, use 1¾ cups sugar per 4 cups of water. About ½ to 2/3 cups of syrup is needed per pint of fruit.

To make sugar packs, simply sprinkle sugar over the fruit and mix gently until the juice is drawn out and the sugar dissolved. Dry packing works best with berries and smaller fruits that give good flavor without sugar. Pack the fruit, seal and freeze. For berries, try spreading the berries out on a cookie sheet and allow fruit to freeze. Then pack the fruit, seal and replace in the freezer.

Peaches, apples, pears and apricots darken quickly when exposed to air and can darken in thawing. Use ascorbic acid in the package to prevent discoloration of fruits during the freezing process. Ascorbic acid in a powder form is available at some drugstores or where freezing supplies are sold. Add ½ teaspoon (1500 milligrams) pure powdered ascorbic acid to cold syrup shortly before using, stir gently so as not to add air. To use in sugar or dry packs, dissolve in 2 or 3 tablespoons of cold water and sprinkle over fruit just before adding sugar.

If you use a commercially sold fruit color preserver that is not pure ascorbic acid, follow the directions on the box.

Once you’ve completed your freezing, be sure to package and label correctly. Most foods require headspace between the packed food and closure to allow for expansion as food freezes. Headspace recommendations can be found at the Web site listed below.

All packaged food should be room temperature or cooler before putting in the freezer. Do not overload your freezer with too much warm food at one time. Quick freezing is best for frozen food quality. Spread the new packages around until they are frozen, then they can be stacked together if desired.

Label all foods with name of food, date and type of pack. Most fruits and vegetables will remain high in quality for eight to 12 months. Longer storage will not make the food unfit for use, but may impair its quality.

It is a good idea to post a list of the frozen foods with freezing dates near the freezer and check the packages off the list as they are removed.

For more information on home-preserving fruits and vegetables or for recipes contact the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://www.homefoodpreservation.com.

By: Maria Pippidis

Poultry Growers Electrical Farm Safety Workshop

Poultry Growers Electrical Farm Safety workshop seeks to save lives

In the aftermath of Bill Brown’s tragic death by electrocution, his colleagues from University of Delaware and University of Maryland Cooperative Extension collaborated to present an important safety workshop in his honor. The sessions were presented live to 95 people at the Carvel REC, attended by others live via webinar, and recorded for the public (links below).

The worskhop was presented live in person, via webinar and recorded for the public
The workshop was presented live in person, via webinar and recorded for the public

While the workshop focused on poultry farm safety, the information available below is applicable to any farm, business, or residential scenario.

Tips such as using insulated tools, wearing leather gloves and electric-rated foot ware, never working alone, spotting risk factors, understanding how electricity works, and how it is delivered to private property all provided eye-opening, yet practical behaviors that can be adopted to prevent a  future casualty or fatality.

Thank you to Carvel REC director Mark Isaacs in working with UD presenters Jim Glancey and Stephen Collier who joined electrician Tim Norman and UMD poultry Extension educators Jenny Rhodes and Jon Moyle in their poignant effort to prevent another tragic accident.

Save a life. Share this information!

Bill Brown May 29, 1961 - April 14, 2016
Presented in memory of Bill Brown
May 29, 1961 – April 14, 2016

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Drink water to refresh, restore, and reinvigorate!

waterWandering through the UD College of Agriculture and Natural Resources’ 2016 AG Day, the Meado-Larks 4-H Club presented a water taste test that was intriguing.  3 small cups of water labeled A, B, and C were sitting on trays and each participant was asked to sample each cup and note their preference on a slip of paper.  Clustered at the educational end of the table were bottled waters and popular beverages.  Participants could spin a spinner to choose one of the beverages pictured and labels on the bottles revealed what was really in those bottles!  Posters also revealed answers to questions such as: Where does my water come from?  If my water source is my well, how frequently should I test my water? Who will test my water? I walked away with a Home Water Testing handout from the United States Environmental Protection Agency, answering all of those questions and much more.  www.epa.gov/safewater/labs

My taste buds put to the test, the preference that I jotted down and placed into the basket was “B”. This was Deer Park, a spring water and the “winner of the day”, per Janice Melson, the Meado-Larks’ founder. Choice “A” was Smart Water, a popular distilled water and choice “C” was Acme’s Refresh, purified water from a public water source, treated to remove chemicals and any harmful bacteria. Spring water comes from underground and naturally flows to the surface of the ground.  It is collected directly from the spring or through a hole tapping the underground formation feeding the spring.  Distilled water is created when water is boiled to collect the vapor and cool it to return to a liquid state for bottling.  Distillation removes bacteria, viruses, heavy metals, and other materials.  Purified water comes from a well, spring, or the public water source, and treated to remove impurities (contaminants and minerals).

Why is water so important?  Often labeled “the Forgotten Nutrient”, water is what makes all the systems in our bodies work.  The Centers for Disease Control says water helps keep your body temperature normal, lubricate and cushion joints, protect your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues, and eliminate wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements.  That’s a nutritional powerhouse!

Are you drinking enough water?  Fluid needs are different, depending on your age, activity level, health status, and environmental conditions.  Thirst should be your guide.  Signs of dehydration or excessive water loss start with fatigue and dry lips and tongue, but progress to heat cramps, dizziness, nausea, delirium and unconsciousness.  Hot temperatures, direct sunlight, and humid summer days call for drinking extra water, especially when you are exercising or playing outdoors. If you have a fever, diarrhea and vomiting, or are pregnant or breastfeeding, your body needs more water. Anyone with a medical condition requiring fluid control, athletes, and those living in extreme conditions have individual water requirements which may not follow current general recommendations.

For adults, the popular guideline to “drink 8 cups of water each day” is not supported by hard evidence, but it is easy to remember and is similar to the recommendation from the Institute of Medicine for total fluid intake from fluids and foods. The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly about 13 cups of total beverages a day. The AI for women is about 9 cups of total beverages a day.  Remember, thirst determines fluid needs. The smaller body size of a child and inability to tell when too thirsty or hot should be a red flag for parents on hot, humid days. Children, four to eight, require 5.5 cups. Teenagers need to drink more- 7 cups for girls and 10.5 cups for boys. When playing during hot weather, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends 5 ounces of cool tap water every 20 minutes for a child weighing 85 pounds and 9 ounces for a teen weighing 132 pounds.

To prevent dehydration and make sure your body has the fluids it needs, make water your beverage of choice. Water has zero calories, is sugar-free, and choosing water instead of sugary drinks reduces your risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Drink a glass of water or other calorie-free or low-calorie beverage with each meal and between each meal. Water is a great choice, but we also need the calcium and vitamin D in fortified, low-fat milk. Drink water before, during and after exercise and on warm days. Some tips for hydrating in hot weather include:

Start hydrating right away. It’s easier to maintain your fluid balance if you start out in a well-hydrated state.

Schedule regular beverage breaks and keep a water bottle handy so you can take frequent sips of water while you work or exercise. Choose electrolyte-replacing drinks for maximum water absorption only when there is a need for rapid replenishment of carbohydrates and/or electrolytes in combination with water during prolonged, vigorous physical activity.

Drink water after you’ve finished work or an exercise session.

Snack on fresh fruits like berries, watermelon, peaches, and nectarines that are high in water volume. Other foods containing water include lettuce, broccoli, milk, orange juice, carrots, yogurt, and apples.

Don’t drink large amounts of plain water all at once – this can lead to hyponatremia or water-toxicity.

While rare, water intoxication is caused when too much water is consumed in a short period of time, diluting other nutrients in the body and putting pressure on the brain. This condition is called hyponatremia. If not treated, it can lead to coma or death.  Endurance athletes, such as marathon runners who drink large amounts of water, are at higher risk of hyponatremia. How do you know if you’ve consumed enough water? One way to gauge your hydration level is to look at the color of your urine. If you’re well-hydrated, it should be pale. Also, you’ll be urinating more frequently.

Water is also easy on the wallet.  You can save money by drinking water from the tap at home or making it your beverage choice when eating out.  Many people think bottled water is purer.  The facts learned at the Meado-Larks’ table showed that both bottled and tap water from a public water source must meet the same standards.  If you get water from a private well, the owner is responsible for testing it, which should be done each year. Contact a private commercial laboratory certified to test drinking water or the Delaware Public Health Laboratory at (302) 223-1520.  The Safe Drinking Water Hotline is (800) 426-4791 or www.epa.gov/safewater/labs

Just remember drink water to refresh, restore, and reinvigorate!

References:

“Home Water Testing.” EPA Office of Water, Bulletin. EPA 816-05-013 May 2005.

Zaneta M. Pronsky, MS,RD,LDN,FADA and Sr. Jeanne P. Crowe, PharmD, RPh. “Food – Medication Interactions, 17th edition.” 2012.

8 Great Reasons to Drink Water. Santa Cruz: Journeyworks, 2014. Print.

Janice Melson, Master Food Educator and 4-H Meado-Larks AG day 2016 water educational display

“Nutrition and Healthy Eating.” Water: How Much Should You Drink Every Day? Mayo Clinic, 05 Sept. 2014. Web. 14 May 2016.

“Dehydration: MedlinePlus.” U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 03 Mar. 2016. Web. 14 May 2016.

“Drinking Water.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 03 June 2014. Web. 14 May 2013.

Crowe, Kristi M., and Coni Francis. “Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Functional Foods.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 113.8 (2013): 1096-103. Web.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DoMore 24 Delaware

Be a part of this great Community Movement that brings together nonprofit organizations, companies, and people committed to making a difference!  Go to DoMore 24 Delaware and donate to the 4-H Foundation found under the education partner category.

https://domore24delaware.com/

What would $24 do for your organization?

  • Partial scholarship to State 4-H Camp or 4-H Day Camp • Funding to support 4-H Awards, Trips and Scholarships to recognize youth • Funding to support 4-H project work in special project activities

What would $48 do for your organization?

  • Partial scholarship to State 4-H Camp or 4-H Day Camp • Funding to support 4-H Awards, Trips and Scholarships to recognize youth • Funding to support 4-H project work in special project activities

What would $124 do for your organization?

  • 50% scholarship to State 4-H Camp • 50% stipend for State 4-H Camp Counselor • Funding to support 4-H Awards, Trips and Scholarships to recognize youth • Funding to support 4-H project work in special project activities

What would $248 do for your organization?

  • Full scholarship to State 4-H Camp • Full stipend for State 4-H Camp Counselor • Funding to support 4-H Awards, Trips and Scholarships to recognize youth • Funding to support 4-H project work in special project activities