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Is There a Genetic Limit to Milk Production?

Cow comfort and herd management, not genetics, is limiting production in most herds, say these geneticists.

With herd averages approaching 40,000 lb of milk per cow and the single lactation record nearly double that, it begs the question: Are we approaching the genetic limits of milk production.

In a word: No, say Kent Weigel, a geneticist with the University of Wisconsin and Chad Dechow, a geneticist with Pennsylvania State University.

“We really aren’t,” says Weigel. The same question was asked 40 years ago when Beecher Arlinda Ellen produced 55,561 lb of milk in a 365-day lactation. That record wasn’t broken for 19 years. But then, the record toppled—again and again and again. Last year, Ever-Green-View My Gold-ET, set a new single lactation milk production record with 77,480 lb in 365 days. In percentage terms, My Gold out-did Ellen by nearly 40%!

“I think we have a little way to go before we reach the limit,” says Dechow. “If you look at the Predicted Transmitting Ability for milk on these record cows, they’re just slightly above average.”

The other way to look at, says Weigel, is to consider feed intake as a multiple of the maintenance requirement. In the 1980 and 1990s, top cows were producing maybe five times their body maintenance levels. “We didn’t have any cows at 6 or 7X maintenance; now we do,” he says.

“So there’s no evidence we’re hitting a limit, but at some time, we might simply reach the physical capacity of the udder, I guess.”

At what cost?

“To me, it more a question of cost,” says Weigel. “Is the extra pound of milk worth the cost of producing it, and is it my best strategy for profitability? If I have to spend 99¢ to get $1 back, is it worth it? Is increasing production per cow the lowest hanging fruit on my farm?”

Selecting for larger cows, with bigger frames and more rumen capacity, is not the answer, say both Weigel and Dechow. “Larger is not more efficient; larger is actually less efficient,” says Dechow. “We actually need smaller cows to be more efficient at current levels of milk production.”

Look at Jerseys. Some Jerseys are making 40,000 lb of milk, and they don’t have nearly the size and scale of Holsteins.

Health traits are becoming a larger proportion of selection indexes, which is a good thing. Unhealthy cows simply burn through calories to power their immune system. “Healthy cows produce more,” says Weigel

A bigger issue might be that farmers are placing less urgency on reproduction than they were a decade ago, says Dechow. Many herds are now reliant on reproductive hormone protocols to get cows bred. But if those tools are ever lost, it could become a problem.

Inbreeding is also a concern, and it continues to increase. Bull studs are doing a good job of weeding out detrimental genetic recessives. The real issue, says Dechow, is that the industry is likely weeding out just the worst recessive genes with obvious problems. “The ones that we don’t see as major recessives may be causing more subtle problems,” he says.

Still, both Weigel and Dechow say industry selection indexes do a pretty good job of balancing production, health traits and conformation. While every herd doesn’t need a customized index, the geneticists say each dairy owner should think about what he or she is trying to accomplish with the genetics they buy. “If there are a diversity of goals, there will be diversity of selection and inbreeding won’t be as big of a concern,” says Weigel.

Genetics isn’t really the issue limiting production and efficiency, he says. “The limiting factors in most herds are cow comfort and herd management.

“Most herds are doing 70% to 80% of things right, and are getting good production. But if they can get 99% right, wow! That’s when you see production jump.”

 

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What is the Effect of Rain Damage on Hay?

Hay that has been cut and then rained on can lose quality in four ways. These include: 1) leaching of soluble carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, 2) increased and prolonged plant respiration, 3) leaf shattering, and 4) microbial breakdown of plant tissue.

Leaching of carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals is usually at its highest when the hay has dried somewhat and we then have a prolonged rain. Rainfall right after cutting usually results in less leaching of nutrients and a quick splash-and-dash shower normally doesn’t result in large losses of these nutrients on freshly cut hay.

Increased or prolonged respiration occurs when hay is not allowed to dry sufficiently to stop the plant’s metabolic processes. Hay must reach moisture content of less than 30 percent for respiration to be reduced to acceptable levels. Hay that is rained on when relatively green will continue to respire for longer periods of time, resulting in the loss of forage nutrients and dry matter yield.

Likewise, partially dried hay that is rained on can continue to respire for longer periods resulting in lower quality and yield of hay.

Increased leaf shatter is another problem associated with hay that has been rained on. Wet hay usually means more mechanical handling of the hay in order to dry it. Since leaves tend to dry quicker than stems, any increased raking or tedding tends to shatter leaves from stems. Since more of the soluble nutrients are in the leaf tissue, the loss of leaf blades while raking and baling can reduce hay quality substantially. Loss of leaf blades can also result in reduction of dry matter yields.

Microbial breakdown of plant tissue occurs when fungi, molds and other microorganisms begin to feed on the downed hay. These organisms develop rapidly in warm-moist conditions and feed on the dead plant material. Hay that is lying on the ground and remains wet for long time periods becomes a perfect environment for these organisms to live and breed. They can quickly consume plant nutrients and destroy plant cell structure resulting in loss of dry matter yield, nutrient content and given time, will completely rot the hay.

What are the consequences of hay being rained on? Research conducted at the University of Kentucky by Michael Collins indicated that we can lose up to 5 percent of the dry matter per inch of rain on cut hay. Digestibility can be reduced by 10 percent or more due to leaching of nutrients and leaf shatter. A similar study done at Iowa State University reported protein loses of 3 percent and total digestible nutrient reduction of 4.6 percent.

One fact seems to hold true, you still cannot tell what the actual quality of the hay is until you have it tested. Testing it is your best strategy for determining the nutrient quality you will get from the hay. Sampling rained-on hay will give you the information you need to design a supplementation program that will keep your animals in good shape during the winter feeding period. Your local county Extension Educator can help you with sampling techniques, hay probes, and testing. For a small investment of time and money, testing will pay off big in the health and nutrition of your herd.

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Florida Scientist: Calves Conceived in Winter Perform Better

Cows and humans have something in common: If you take better care of the mother during pregnancy, her children are likely to be healthier – and this impact should last a lifetime, a University of Florida scientist says.

In the case of cows, cool conditions are key. A new UF/IFAS study shows calves conceived during winter went on to produce more calves and milk.

That’s a critical finding for dairy farmers and for people looking for a nutritious glass of milk because each Florida cow produces an average of 2,408 gallons of milk per year.

“This is important to figure out because maybe we can improve the conditions from conception on in order to get an animal to do as well as possible throughout its existence,” said Albert De Vries, a UF/IFAS associate professor of animal sciences. “The current thinking is that the environment plays an important role from at least conception on.”

Florida has about 124,000 dairy cows, the study said.

For the study, researchers examined 667,000 cow lactation records for the years 2000 through 2012 from the Dairy Herd Information Association database. They obtained weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Scientists considered a heat and humidity index higher than 68 to cause heat stress in the cows.

Through these records, De Vries and lead author Pablo Pinedo of Colorado State University documented effects of heat stress during conception on the calf’s performance when it becomes a cow. A calf grows into a cow about two years after birth.

They found that calves conceived in the cool season fared better from day 1 of their pregnancies. Now researchers want to know whether the biological mechanism that causes that effect on day 1 or later.

“Perhaps we can do something during early gestation, even if the mom is still under heat stress,” De Vries said.

The study is published in the Journal of Dairy Science.

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Be Aware of Drug Testing Changes

By Gabe Middleton 

Preventing drug residues in milk continues to be a key area that dairy producers should focus on, but starting on July 1, 2017, that prevention will develop another layer. The tetracycline screening pilot program will begin, and no less than 1 out of 15 tanker loads of milk will be tested for oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, and tetracycline. The tolerance level for the drug will be 300 ppb.

This testing pilot program represents an opportunity for dairy producers to re-evaluate how the tetracycline class of drugs is used on the farm. Oxytetracycline injectable is labeled for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia and infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye).

Many producers may use oxytetracycline in an extra-label indication for treatment of mastitis, metritis, or topically for the treatment of digital dermatitis (hairy heel warts). Under the direction of your veterinarian, extra-label drug use is legal as long as established withdrawals periods are adjusted when necessary.

Many producers, veterinarians, and hoof trimmers use the tetracycline class of drugs to wrap feet affected by digital dermatitis. This represents a risk of milk residue under the upcoming tetracycline screening pilot program.  Wrapping a foot with tetracycline (powder or injectable) and not withholding milk puts the producer at risk for a milk residue violation.

FARAD (Food Animal Drug Residue Avoidance Databank) recommends a 24-hour milk withhold when a cow’s foot is wrapped with tetracycline. While tetracycline foot wraps aren’t directly affected by the veterinary feed directive legislation, the powder tetracycline product switched from over-the-counter to prescription status on January 1, 2017.

Tetracycline powders are only available with a veterinary prescription and a valid veterinary/client/patient relationship.  Anyone applying tetracycline to a foot wrap should pay close attention to the amount of the drug they apply. More drug creates more risk for milk residue. Only a small amount should be applied directly to the lesion. Experts have suggested that a 2 gram dose is the maximum that should be applied to a wrap.

Small herds more vulnerable

Smaller herds need to be even more diligent in monitoring and obeying milk withhold guidelines due to the lack of dilution factor. While larger herds may be at less risk, they should still obey the withhold guidelines on all tetracycline products to maintain the integrity of the milk they sell. Ultimately, the dairy industry can’t justify improper drug withholds based simply on dilution.

This program should also renew the producers’ commitment to lameness in general and digital dermatitis specifically. This is an excellent time to review footbath protocols and scrutinize heifer facilities. We know that it’s critical to prevent hairy heel warts prior to first calving. Often times, cleanliness is a critical step in preventing digital dermatitis in heifer facilities.

While producers may view this new testing protocol as additional level of regulation, consider it another step in improving the quality and safety of the product that the dairy industry has to offer. Antibiotic use needs to be transparent on our dairies.

This program is another way for the industry to open the blinds and let the public see what we are doing to care for cows and provide a safe product. As long as the tetracycline class of drugs are used properly, the dairy industry will have nothing to hide.

 

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Using antibiotics responsibly, part 1

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — When we do need to use antibiotics, we know that we need to use them responsibly (in both animals and people) to help keep them effective and available for decades to come. What are some of the steps to help make this happen? In caring for cattle, responsible use of antibiotics involves many things and people, but there’s one person who should continue to be part of these decisions — a veterinarian.

Veterinarians strive to prescribe antibiotics in a responsible way.

“As veterinarians, we have an ethical responsibility to make sure that we preserve the efficacy of antibiotics for future generations and ensure continued access to certain classes of antibiotics in food animals,” said Robin Falkner, DVM, managing veterinarian at Zoetis. “We use our medical training when we prescribe these medicines to restore or maintain animal health and well-being, and we take the responsibility of using them very seriously.”

Veterinarians strive to prescribe antibiotics in a responsible way to not only help treat infections but also to help reduce the unintended risk of antimicrobial resistance. This includes helping producers:

  • Decrease the need to use antibiotics. Doing things to help keep animals from ever getting sick is our top priority, Dr. Falkner said. This means looking at disease management and making tweaks that can help prevent disease outbreaks.
  • Ensure antibiotics are used only when they are needed. Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infection. Veterinarians help identify if a bacterial disease is present or likely to be present, and then can recommend the right antibiotic to help address the disease challenge. For instance, there are four key bacterial pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease, and we can recommend an antibiotic that will be effective against these pathogens, Dr. Falkner said.
  • Reduce the need for additional antibiotic treatments. Animals sometimes get sick, so when we do need to treat these animals, our priority becomes getting the highest treatment success, Dr. Falkner said. There are different classes of antibiotics that work in different ways. For example, a triamilide macrolide, such as DRAXXIN®(tulathromycin) Injectable Solution, works by interfering with protein synthesis in target pathogens, and a cephalosporin, such as EXCEDE® (ceftiofur crystalline free acid) Sterile Suspension, kills bacteria by destroying cell walls. If you have the right antibiotic that works the first time, you can use fewer antibiotics and have fewer animals exposed to multiple classes of antibiotics.
  • Avoid antibiotic residues in meat. Proper administration and following label instructions are important to ensure product efficacy and safety. This means reviewing treatment protocols with your veterinarian about the correct dose, route of administration and adhering to proper withdrawal times.

See the results of a good relationship.

“What I find is, when the veterinarian understands what’s important to the producer in the long-term, the veterinarian can make recommendations beyond just treating the immediate animal that’s sick,” Dr. Falkner said. “It takes effort, and the intent of both parties, to develop that type of relationship and see the results that this relationship can bring.”

For Brenda Paul, owner at Timberlawn Farm in Paris, Kentucky, it means she can keep making improvements. Having a veterinarian’s input enhances animal health decisions that can help maintain the responsible use of antibiotics.

“An outside opinion is a very helpful thing to have,” Paul said.  “We’re constantly evaluating what’s working, what’s not working and what changes we need to make.”

Her veterinarian helps in evaluating data to see if they’re heading in the right direction, if there’s a treatment need, or if they need a change in the protocol.

“We’ve been working together on developing this program over all the years we’ve been in the business,” Paul said. “And that will continue for many years.”

Next up: Did you know that the effectiveness of an antibiotic also plays a role in responsible use? Part 2 of this series will explore the relationship, so stay tuned. In the meantime, keep working with a veterinarian on the responsible use of antibiotics and find more information at ZoetisUS.com/DRAXXIN-Beef.com.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR DRAXXIN: DRAXXIN has a pre-slaughter withdrawal time of 18 days in cattle. Do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. Do not use in animals known to be hypersensitive to the product. See full Prescribing Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR EXCEDE: People with known hypersensitivity to penicillin or cephalosporins should avoid exposure to EXCEDE. EXCEDE is contraindicated in animals with known allergy to ceftiofur or to the ß-lactam group (penicillins and cephalosporins) of antimicrobials. Inadvertent intra-arterial injection is possible and fatal. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Pre-slaughter withdrawal time is 13 days following the last dose. See full Prescribing Information.

Zoetis

– See more at: https://www.morningagclips.com/using-antibiotics-responsibly-part-1/?utm_content=articles&utm_campaign=NLCampaign&utm_source=Newsletter&utm_term=newsletteredition&utm_medium=email#sthash.OgkeLixq.dpuf

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2017 Milk Run

CAMDEN, Del. — More than 90 runners took off in torrential downpour at a cool 50 degrees on May 13 at Middletown High School to compete in the 5th annual 5K Milk Run/Walk held by the Delaware Farm Bureau Foundation and the New Castle County Farm Bureau. State Sen. David Sokola led the race on his bicycle, as he has every year. There was a great turnout from the Alfred G. Waters FFA and the Everett Meredith Middle School FFA.

While final figures are not yet in, organizers are certain that the goal of raising at least $10,000 to meet the annual needs of The Ministry of Caring’s “Milk For Children Fund” will be met. Net proceeds from the event will go to help MOC’s Emmanuel Dining Room serve a nutritious glass of milk to every child in need who walks through their doors. A secondary beneficiary is The Neighborhood House Inc. in Middletown, a United Way partner agency which helps struggling families get back on their feet.

More than 30 agribusinesses, dairies and farm families provided sponsorship for the race. Major sponsors included Land O’Lakes, Syngenta, New Castle County Farm Bureau, Willey Farms and Hy-Point Dairy.

“After five years I continue to be amazed at the support from the agriculture community for our event — everyone from FFA groups and small dairy farms to large milk processors and everyone in between, they rise to the cause,” said Stewart Ramsey, NCCFB president.

In the past, the race has been staged at the Appoquinimink High School in Middletown, but a new location was necessitated by DelDOT’s Route 301 construction. Middletown High School made their grounds available.

Laura Simpson, DFBF project coordinator, said she liked the new venue because there was more room.

“We appreciate being able to use Middletown High School,” she said. Next year’s venue has not been determined.

“Despite the pouring rain, runners were in great spirits,” Simpson said. “Ninety-four runners finished the race, all within an hour, which I feel was impressive.”

The winner, Rick Short, finished in 20 minutes, 11.2 seconds. Only seconds behind him were Gerardo Rivas, Jay Fenton and Godfrey Thuku. Jonathan Fitch came in less than 22 minutes.

Leaders among female runners were Lissy Haney and Casey Hagy at less than 23 minutes. Missy Lipscomb, Heather Guerrieri and Annika Roberts were third through fifth, respectively, all in less than 26 and a half minutes.

Runners ranged in age from 5 to 67, and included a great turnout from the FFA. Some participants were from Maryland, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

During the past five years, 800 runners and walkers have participated in the event, raising awareness of the critical need for more milk for less fortunate children in the local community. In the first four years, almost $75,000 has been raised in this effort to buy milk for children in Delaware.

If rain doesn’t dampen the spirits of runners, will mud? The Foundation will sponsor an inaugural “Mad Bull Mud Run” on Aug. 19 at Delaware State Fairgrounds, with plenty of mud and challenging but fun obstacles to overcome. Net proceeds will go to support the Foundation’s mission to build awareness, understanding and positive public perception about Delaware’s farm operations and fresh local food. The Foundation also raises funds to provide educational materials, grants, scholarships and to feed hungry Delawareans.

For information about the mud run or if you wish to be a named sponsor, contact Laura Simpson at the Delaware Farm Bureau at 302-697-3183 or via email at laura.simpson@defb.org. Find additional information on Delaware Farm Bureau Foundation, visit defb.org.

Delaware Farm Bureau

Spread the Word

– See more at: https://www.morningagclips.com/rain-didnt-dampen-spirits-at-5k-milk-run/#sthash.8hImLCtT.dpuf

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Parasite in your Flock

LANCASTER, Pa. — Do you find yourself throwing away eggs after treating your flock for internal parasites? Although it’s nearly impossible to keep your chickens completely worm-free year-round, proper management can help prevent parasite issues in your flock.

Why should you care about worms in your birds?

Worm, or parasite, infestations can cause poor growth, decreased egg production and in severe cases, death. Internal parasites can also make a flock more susceptible to diseases or make existing diseases worse.[1]

Backyard birds can easily ingest internal parasite eggs while scratching the ground and foraging for bugs, including snails, slugs, grasshoppers, ants and earthworms. Insects can also harbor parasite eggs, which infect your birds when ingested.

If your birds are not behaving normally and seem distant from the rest of the flock, it could be a sign of parasites causing illness. Pay close attention to your birds for additional symptoms of internal parasites:

  • Appetite loss
  • Weight loss
  • Watery droppings
  • Dehydration
  • Hens stop laying
  • Separation from the rest of the flock
  • Balance and coordination loss due to weakness
  • Poor feather quality
  • Dull combs, wattles and eyes

While parasite infections can be serious, being proactive can help prevent parasites from ever becoming an issue. Here are nine ways to help keep your birds happy, healthy and parasite-free:

  1. Avoid overcrowding – Give birds plenty of room to be comfortable. Overcrowding can cause an abundance of germs in a small area.
  2. Clean coops at least once a week – Cleaning and adding fresh bedding prevents infected droppings from accumulating.
  3. Avoid introducing infested chickens to the flock – Purchase your chickens as newborn chicks. If you purchase adult birds, quarantine them for a minimum of two weeks to monitor their health and assess for potential disease and parasite symptoms.[2]
  4. Avoid giving feed or treats on the ground – Ground pecking for feed and treats increases the risk of your flock consuming parasitic bugs and encountering droppings from contaminated birds.
  5. Keep chickens off freshly tilled ground – Chickens love to eat bugs and freshly tilled ground turns up insects possibly hosting parasite eggs. Keeping your flock away from freshly tilled areas can help limit their exposure to an overabundance of tasty bugs.
  6. Keep wild birds away from your flock – Wild birds could be infected with parasites and shed parasite eggs through their droppings.
  7. Use integrated pest management (IPM) practices to control insect populations – IPM practices are an eco-friendly way to eliminate or control factors required for pests to survive.
  8. Test and sanitize drinking water –  One sick bird can infect the rest of the flock simply by contaminating the waterers. Test and sanitize the water, and keep waterers and feeders cleaned to help control or reduce the chance of spreading infection.
  9. Target worms – Use an all-natural supplement to help breakdown the natural defenses of intestinal worms and their eggs. This makes parasites more susceptible to attack by the bird’s immune system, stomach acids and bacteria in the gut.

Naturally preventing diseases before they start is the best strategy to support the immune system of your birds, prevent expensive, time-consuming veterinarian visits and maintain a happy, healthy flock. For more information about poultry health, visit dbcagproducts.com and “like” the Healthy Flock Facebook page.

– See more at: https://www.morningagclips.com/9-ways-to-prevent-parasites-in-your-flock/?utm_content=articles&utm_campaign=NLCampaign&utm_source=Newsletter&utm_term=newsletteredition&utm_medium=email#sthash.NJwlBegF.dpuf

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Considerations for Planting Alfalfa in Spring

By Karla Hernandez, South Dakota State University ExtensionProducers are trying to get their alfalfa planted. Some areas have been very wet which have made this process very difficult to accomplish. Here are some considerations to keep in mind when planting alfalfa this growing season.

Considerations when planting alfalfa

  1. Alfalfa seed requires a well-drained soil for optimum production. Poor soil drainage can cause problems with soil crusting which may cause poor soil aeration, micronutrient toxicity, and ice damage during winter.
  2. It is important to remember to take soil samples before planting to determine pH and nutrient status of the field.
  3. Seedbed preparation is a critical step to ensure good germination of alfalfa seed. Firm seedbeds will reduce the possibility of planting too deep and will help hold moisture closer to the surface. Packing the soil will help to insure a firm seedbed and good soil moisture retention.
  4. Determining when to plant alfalfa depends on several factors such as soil moisture and cropping practices. For best results in South Dakota alfalfa should be seeded between mid-April to mid-May.
  5. Seed should be covered with enough soil to provide moist conditions for germination. Seed placement of ¼ to ½ inch deep is appropriate on most soils at rates from 10 to 25 lb seed/acre.
  6. Seeding alfalfa with a companion crop such as annual ryegrass, oats, spring barley, or spring triticale can help to minimize weed competition during establishment. However, planting alfalfa without a companion crop allows producers to harvest more alfalfa with higher quality in the seeding year.
  7. Pure stands of alfalfa will produce the highest quality forage and for that reason has the highest demand from the dairy industry. Other producers whose animals’ nutrient requirements are lower may be interested in using alfalfa/grass blends to take advantage of improved persistency while still meeting the nutrient requirements of their livestock.
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Milking Shorthorn

By Melissa Elischer, Michigan State University Extension

Have you ever looked at a dairy cow and wondered about the history of the breed? Michigan State University Extension will explore the history of the seven major breeds of dairy cattle in the U.S. Holstein cattle were the first in the series, followed by Jerseys and Ayrshires, Guernseys and Brown Swiss. The sixth breed to be discussed is Milking Shorthorns.

In contrast to other dairy cattle breeds, Shorthorns originated as a dual purpose breed, meaning they were used for both milk and meat. As the genetic focus of cattle split to specialize in either beef or dairy production, different breeding lines were also established.

Like Jersey, Ayrshire and Guernsey cattle, Milking Shorthorns originated in the United Kingdom. Milking Shorthorns were first developed along the Tees River in the norther part of England. Although references to cattle with “short horns” can be found as early as 1600, the breed did not see its modern roots until the late 1700s. Two brothers, Robert and Charles Colling, were selectively line breeding to improve the native Durham cattle. The brothers had four superior cows and one bull that were the start of their genetic line. In addition to the Collings, two other men were refining another native cattle breed. Thomas Bates and John Booth were selectively breeding Teeswater cattle; Booth worked to improve the beef quality of Shorthorn cattle, while Bates was focused on the dairy characteristics of the breed.

Shorthorns were first introduced in the United States in 1783 in Virginia and became a very popular breed for settlers because of the cattle’s versatility and calm disposition. They spread quickly throughout the country and can be found in nearly every state today, and they’re popular in England, Canada and Australia.

Milking Shorthorns are known for their structural soundness, calving ease, long production life and feed efficiency. Milking Shorthorns coat colors include white, red and road, which is a color that is a very close mix of red and white. Milk from Shorthorn cows averages 3.8 percent fat and 3.3-3.5 percent protein. Also, the breed has one of the lowest average somatic cell scores in the U.S. and Canada.

There are numerous organizations for Milking Shorthorn breeders around the world, many of whom also have junior or youth organizations. To learn more about Milking Shorthorns in the U.S. and around the world, visit the following websites:

Michigan State University Extension and the Michigan 4-H Youth Development program help to create a community excited about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). 4-H STEM programming seeks to increase science literacy, introducing youth to the experiential learning process that helps them to build problem-solving, critical-thinking and decision-making skills. Youth who participate in 4-H STEM content are better equipped with critical life skills necessary for future success. To learn more about the positive impact of Michigan 4-H youth in STEM literacy programs read our 2015 Impact Report: “Building Science Literacy and Future STEM Professionals.”

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5K Milk Run/Walk to benefit milk fund

CAMDEN, Del. — The Delaware Farm Bureau Foundation and the New Castle County Farm Bureau will hold their fifth annual 5K Milk Run/Walk on May 13 at the Middletown High School, 120 Silver Lake Road, Middletown, Del., to benefit The Ministry of Caring’s “Milk For Children Fund.” Net proceeds from the event will go to help MOC’s Emmanuel Dining Room serve a nutritious glass of milk to every child in need who walks through their doors. A secondary beneficiary is The Neighborhood House Inc. in Middletown, a United Way partner agency which helps struggling families get back on their feet.

Note this is a new location necessitated by DelDOT’s Route 301 construction. Registration is at 8 a.m. and the race starts at 9 a.m. Entry fee for runners or walkers who register by May 10 is $20. Registration after May 10 through the day of the race is $25. Free t-shirts will be given to all pre-registered runners/walkers.

The public is invited to participate or to watch the race. There will be live animals to see and ice cream available to keep you cool.

During the past four years, 700 runners and walkers have participated in the event, raising awareness of the critical need for more milk for less fortunate children in the local community. Almost $75,000 has been raised in this effort to buy milk for children in Delaware.

The Delaware Farm Bureau established the Delaware Farm Bureau Foundation in 2013 to build awareness, understanding and positive public perception about Delaware’s farm operations and fresh local food. The foundation also raises funds to provide educational materials, grants, scholarships and to feed hungry Delawareans.

To register for the Milk Run 5K Run/Walk or to make an online donation, visit www.races2run.com/milk-run. For information about the race or if you wish to be a named sponsor, contact Laura Simpson at the Delaware Farm Bureau at 302-697-3183 or via email at laura.simpson@defb.org. Find additional information on Delaware Farm Bureau Foundation, visit defb.org. For more information on the beneficiary organizations, visit www.ministryofcaring.org or www.neighborhoodhse.org.

Delaware Farm Bureau

– See more at: https://www.morningagclips.com/5k-milk-runwalk-to-benefit-milk-fund/#sthash.MsEtNlGS.dpuf

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